The good, the bad, and the ugly of Spotify and streaming.

Buying an album was always a rite of passage.  From purchasing your first album to the excited trepidation of waiting for the long-awaited release of your favourite artist.  In some ways going down to whichever record store it was in some ways akin to going the match. There is the hype of the reviews as they dissect the album and then finally the day it is released when you get a chance to see if it lives up to your expectations.

Sometimes it can be the sheer high of listening to something that is on another level and a feeling that the band or singer has done it again. There can be that extra heart beat moment of knowing that this is something special. Equally it can be a damp squib, a stomach lurching feeling of seeing your team go two goals down within ten minutes in a cup final. Even though you know it’s rubbish you convince yourself that it will get better after a few more listens but sadly it doesn’t.

Discovering an album can be just simply judging it be the cover or listening to a song that you take a plunge. A mate may even recommend a band that you wished you had discovered years ago. It’s the sheer joy of discovering a new artist and expanding your own tastes.

Now music is not only more accessible but can be instantly be obtained.  The internet and indeed the speed of downloading has changed how we listen and obtain music.  Gone are the days of copying a mate’s CD onto tape  now you can do it from your lap top.

Of course it caused a furore as piracy rose due to illegal downloads but the likes of apple not only made downloading legit but changed how we listen to music.

In some respects it went back to the early days of popular music where the importance for an artist was to make that catchy song.  A successful tune could pave the way in terms of making money and obtaining new fans.  It was why Pink Floyd were unsure what direction they had to take when Syd Barrett left as he was the one (at the time) who the rest of Floyd felt had the ability to write that unique song.

As music evolved an album became something serious that had to be listened from the beginning to the start.  Ironically Pink Floyd developed albums such as the dark side of the moon that was meant to be a journey and not a case of picking selected tracks.

With apple and later Spotify this all changed.  If you hear a song on the radio you can download it instantly.  The choice is yours as you can download the tracks that you like.  That warbling, self-indulgent track, well I am not listening to that.  Even if the artist intends for the album to be listened in full you don’t have to.

Technology has changed how we listen and in some respects means more choice.  Whereas once there was only the radio to discover music and word of mouth, this can be done via Spotify.  It can be done via playlists, recommendations or simply genres.  The only difference now is that people no longer go out and buy the album only add it to their favourites list or include it in their own playlists.

This of course causes problems as infamously highlighted by Radiohead’s Thom Yorke who decried that Spotify was underselling musicians.  It is certainly true that royalties are not that great and now musicians tend to make the money by touring or performing at festivals.

Critics have highlighted concerns about new artists not being given the opportunity to develop and that there is nothing new on the scene.  In some respects that is certainly true in the sense the media can’t cite a movement such as punk, grunge, or even Brit Pop.  Indeed the last Indie band to make an impact probably has to be the Arctic Monkeys.  Yet their popularity was down to using social media.

Despite the criticism of Spotify it does provide an opportunity to discover new music and artists.  From this I have discovered the Thee oh sees, got back into listening to funk with Curtis Mayfield, and garage blues such as the Kills.

The joy of producing my own mix tape has been revived as I can set  up playlists which means having a diverse range from Megadeth to Otis Reading with bits of blues and even disco mixed in between.

The only difference that I have noticed is that in the past year I have scarcely bought any albums.  Being old school I would have bought the Thee oh sees album but for whatever reason I haven’t got round to it and listen on Spotify.  Don’t get me wrong I still love buying albums albeit CDs.  There is still that excitement of holding it in your hand and examining the inside sleeve but it’s just that the way I consume music has moved on.

Of course the field has changed for musicians although they probably still rely on radio airplay to get a track promoted.  There is that much choice to listen to your preferred tastes whereas previously the radio held much clout on what was listened to.  Now anyone can delve into their preferred choices.

It’s not just music that has changed on how we consume it but television as well.  With faster broadband speeds the opportunity to download TV shows and films has led to the rise of Netflix’s and Amazon prime.  With a choice of quality shows you can now watch whenever you want and even binge watch the set in one go.

Never mind having to find to follow a show at a set date and time you don’t even have to worry about DVD’s.  The rise of streaming probably helped lead to the demise of Blockbuster’s as you don’t need to venture out of your living room or be disappointed if all the copies have been rented out.

Added to which there is catch up TV such as BBC I player that means you can watch your favourite programme at a time that is convenient for you.  It is not just BBC programmes but ITV, Channel Four, and Sky to name but a few.

Even radio offers you the choice to listen to programmes that you miss.  Right now I am listening to 6 music’s Huey Morgan show because it is convenient for me.  If it wasn’t available then there is no way I would be able to listen live on Saturday.

Of course this works both ways as it provides the opportunity for the media to increase its audiences right across the spectrum and that is the good side of streaming and downloading music or television shows.  There is more choice now than there ever is and more control for the listener or the viewer.

It is inevitable that there is going to be some sort of impact especially piracy.  Sky seems to be suffering simply because people find ways of streaming matches to watch their team rather than pay the high price of a subscription.

Music too it could be argued is suffering from downloading and streaming.  Bands are finding it harder to get their music heard and albums are no longer listened in the way they were once intended.

Nevertheless there is a demand for it and the reason for that and I am willing to hold my hand is that it is accessible.  There is more choice and still a chance to discover new music.  What the future holds who knows.  People will always love music and maybe styles will change.

At present musicians performing live seems to be the best way of making of money and it probably won’t be long before the likes of Amazon Prime, Apple, Facebook, and maybe even Netflix’s may consider streaming a live show so that everyone can enjoy that moment of that band or singer performing live.  After all there are many who would probably have paid to see a live showing of Led Zeppelin’s reunion a few years back.  Maybe that will be the next step for music.

 

 

 

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Roger Nouveau – the modern fan of the Premier league era

 

There was a time when the football season ended in May and certainly in the odd year when there wasn’t a World Cup or European championship then that would be that until August.  Granted there would be a little bit of transfer speculation but it felt like a proper break away from football that come late August you would embrace it like a glass of cold water after hiking across the Sahara desert.

Now the coverage is constant that you almost wonder if the season has ever really ended.  Every day during the summer months there is the endless constant speculation of who is moving where that at times it matches the political intrigue of Macbeth.

That though is the circus that is the Premier league.  It needs to feed the hype and speculation in order to keep selling its product which is how it and let’s be honest football clubs see supporters as customers.

The money that is not only being pumped into football through television deals but spent on players is mind-blowing.  With the average player going for thirty million pounds the sense of any true value has been lost.  For Sky the billions spent on securing the rights to screening Premier league football is not just about securing the survival of the channel but about the clubs spending big so that supporters world-wide will continue to watch.  Hence the continuation of subscriptions and now in the age of streaming the reliance on overseas television rights.

Consequently it is important to keep generating the speculation about talks of Bale going to Manchester United for example or Ronaldo returning back to the UK.  With huge sums of money being spent it is meant to convince people that the Premier league is the one to watch and that Sky can provide this exclusive access.

The drama of deadline day is now something that is part of football.  At times it represents as though it is a life changing moment such as the Berlin wall coming down.  If it was watched twenty-five years ago people would wonder if it was a spoof as the coverage at times resembled Chris’ Morris’s Day to Day.  Who for example could forget the hapless reporter who had a purple dildo waved in his ear outside Everton’s Finch farm?

Football now is about marketing and rather than being a fan of the sport is more about being seen at the event.  It is more about construing an image rather than participating as a supporter.   Everything now is all about presentation so that for example Liverpool v Burnley on a cold February afternoon is a unique game to remember.  From the naff Premier league anthem, the presentation tops that both sides wear as they shake hands to the referee picking the ball up from the podium.  Gone are the days when both teams ran out and prior to kick off a firm hand shake from both Captains before tossing a coin to decide who would kick off from which half.  Half and half scarves which are wrong on so many levels are now souvenirs for the tourist who visits and will most likely not return again.

Packages are sold for tourists to sample ‘the real passionate white-hot heat of the Kop,’ that has helped Liverpool win major games over the years.  Ironically those type of supporters who are used for the posters have been priced out.  For those that have remained they are now well into middle-age and less inclined to be noisy as they once were in their youth.

The sound of seats clanking up as Crystal Palace took the lead against Liverpool in the last ten minutes was louder than the cries of encouragement than Liverpool fans as a large majority slunked off.  Previously there would be a stunned pause and a loud roar, snarling, and willing Liverpool to equalise and even grab a winner.  Now those type of supporters who throw in the towel are the first into their cars to moan about how Klopp doesn’t know what he is doing whilst incredibly questioning the players passion.

Radio phone ins and social media keep the interest and drama of the product alive.  Everybody can be an expert and whereas a similar incident from thirty years ago would barely generate a headline now a dodgy penalty is given the coverage of JFK being shot.  A soundbite or controversial comment from the manager is used to keep the hysteria and if a club is having a bad run of results well then the hysteria hits meltdown.  Rumours of losing the dressing room and the dreaded vote of confidence are mooted.

This of course encourages the expert fan who never goes the game but watches from his armchair who gets on the blower to say something incredibly stupid.  Once on the air they will preach their ignorance which of course ignites another load of angry calls which feeds the frenzy rather than any genuine debate and discussion about the game.   In other words its click bait with newspaper distributing articles or tweets knowing full well they will get hits and replies.

Part of the hype has brought a sense of entitlement amongst this new elite of supporters.  Unless their team is two-nil up within ten minutes they are screaming and slamming their prized hampers with frustration.  Of course nobody likes to get beat or drop points in vital games but if the players have given everything then at least accept they have done everything.  Besides moaning is not going to help and only makes the players more nervous.

The problem in this Sky era of football is that it has made supporters accountants who believe the Premier league is the be all and end all.  It is a remarkable achievement by Sky and the Premier league that a season of mediocrity is more acceptable than getting to a Cup final.

Getting into the top four is seen as a trophy with the money that a spot in the Champions league generates.  The money though doesn’t go into the pocket of supporters and nor does it mean extra money to bolster that squad.  A budget has been set regardless and players although ambitious will move where the money is regardless of whether the team is in the Champions league or not.  Yet supporters believe this spin that has been spun and would put a top four finish above winning the FA cup and a trip to Wembley.

Football is now increasingly about the hype and making as much money as possible from this new world-wide fan base.  That’s why clubs fly over to Australia, the far east, even the USA because there is money to be made and not because it will help pre-season training.

The International Champions cup which is currently a pre-season tournament can be seen as a future replacement or rival with the UEFA champions league.  With the money that it generated (incredibly ticket prices for the Madrid v Barcelona game in Miami  went for $5,500) it wouldn’t be a surprise if this happened.

Of course this would be by invitation only and not by earning a place.  After all despite AC Milan being a pale shadow of the team that they once were they have a global appeal and therefore can sell.  These games would not be played in the home cities but various stadiums across the globe to generate more cash and global appeal.  In turn these clubs such as Barcelona, Real Madrid, Manchester United, Liverpool, and AC Milan would in effect be the footballing equivalent of the Harlem Globe Trotters.

This is why the controversial thirty-nine Premier league game was mooted.  Forget about upsetting the balance of fairness of the competition there is more money to be had from sales abroad and the television deals that would be made as a result.  Although dropped the idea still lurks like Jaws stalking Amity Island.

The £198 million deal for Neymar wasn’t just about signing a top player or even a signal of intent of winning the Champions league but about putting PSG as a major force in the global market.  Of course it is an intent to win the major honours but the price gets publicity, courts new supporters from across the world, and therefore increases the television deals.  Added to which is the marketing appeal that Neymar brings not just in terms of shirt sales but other promotions in the interest of PSG.

Madrid, Barcelona, Manchester United and any other big names spend big simply to boost their global appeal as well as improving the team.  Signing the top players keeps that interest and makes supporters excited that the latest big name has joined their club.

Increasingly football is moving away from its community and identity that clubs had.  Slogans such as ‘more than a club,’ ‘you’ll never walk alone,’ are increasingly sounding more like a brand rather than ‘the real thing,’ that it once had.  Even St. Pauli who view themselves as very much to the left in their ideals find that the skull and bones flag once flown as a symbol of defiance, has now been marketed.  Indeed you could argue that St. Pauli has now been sold as a ‘kult club,’ for people wanting something different.

Football is far removed from the working class game that it once was.  Certainly amongst the big clubs they are a brand that can be consumed as easily as a can of coke.  Hype and money keeps it ticking over with the global fan base proving ever more lucrative.  Just don’t surprised when the only connection that a football club has with its community is the name.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Downton Abbey effect on history

Nostalgia,” as George Ball the American diplomat once said “is a seductive liar.”  This is certainly the case with dramas such as Downton Abbey, Victoria, and the Crown.  They paint a different world that indicates a gentler more British way of life than today.  However the reality is different to the world that it portrays which is why it needs to be challenged lest the voices of those who really helped shaped our world are forgotten.

Downton Abbey in many respects is guilty of this and portrays for some nostalgists how they like to think Britain once was and still should be.  In that world the Lord of the manor smiles benevolently whilst those down under not only know their place but are happy with their lot.  If there are any problems  then the Lord of the manor will sort it out.

Looking at the period that Downton Abbey covers from the beginning of the twentieth century is a world away from what it was really like to work as a servant in those times.  For starters the servants world would consist of virtually working from the crack of dawn right through to the late hours of the evening.  There would hardly be any time to call your own and you certainly were not expected to be seen never mind tell their betters what problems you had.

Therefore it was not a surprise that the majority of servants were recruited from orphanages  from the other side of the country so that they had nowhere to run back to.  They were seen as chattel who were there to serve and certainly not to fraternize to the extent that the chauffeur marries the Earl’s daughter and is welcomed into the bosom of the family.

Robert Crawley would be more likely to say to his butler ‘As you know Carson, one likes to run a progressive household but damn it I wouldn’t be able to show my face at one’s club if the Chauffeur was my son-in-law.  So show the bolshy sort the door forthwith Carson my good man.’

If you were to believe the historical depiction of the Edwardian period in Downton Abbey it was a relatively peaceful one.  The British Empire was at its peak and although everything might not be perfect everybody seemed to be getting along. For sure the rich and the upper classes were enjoying the prosperity of the Edwardian golden age but life for the ordinary person was one of poverty, poor living and working conditions.  Just look at any pictures from that period.  The children are mainly bare-footed and dressed in tatty clothes.  The adults fare no better with most looking small and even malnourished.  The houses were slums and were unfit to live in that the life expectancy for working class people was low.

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Consequently it was not surprising that workers demanded improvements as they wanted fair pay, better living conditions, housing, education, to name but a few issues that anyone today would feel is a basic right.  The ordinary person era of that era had to fight for it that it was a turbulent period that frightened the political elite.

Now in the world of Downton Abbey there are no talks of soldiers being sent to Llanelli during the first national railway strike of 1911 who shot dead two strikers.  Nor of Churchill sending gunboats up the Mersey during the Liverpool 1911 Transport strike.  This was in response to riots that broke out after mounted Police had charged a 80,000 crowd at St. George’s hall who were there to listen to the Trade Unionist Tom Mann.  Thousands were injured with the Liverpool Echo at the time likening the scenes to revolutionary Paris of 1789.

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More strikes and unrest during that period between 1910-14 broke out across the country in places such as Hull and Belfast.  The period was one of uncertainty with workers fighting for a better more equal world.  For instance just look at the 80,000 crowd at St. George’s hall, Liverpool that it looks very similar to the Arab spring a few years back.  Yet this is never widely mentioned in history never mind someone making a drama of it.

Liverpool_transport_strike-1911

Recently there has been a spate of what can only be described as PR films for the Royal family such as Victoria, and the Crown.  These are lavish biscuit tin productions that belong in a Disney fairy story.

The stories are sold as young Queen’s who at times reluctantly have to make the tough decisions that they may not like to bring stability to the country.  Again it depicts that only the nobility have the grace, wisdom, and benevolence to rule the country.  There is nothing about the poverty and the wrongs of the British Empire.  Instead the ordinary people are there as a background as they sit back and listen to their betters.

Both ignore about whether having a Monarchy is actually democratic but instead portray the Monarchy as a positive good.  The aristocracy are born to rule whilst its subjects are there to serve.   It is an inconvenient truth that the upper classes did not want the working class to be educated nor did they feel that they were entitled to free health treatment.

All of this as well as better living conditions were fought for by workers and were given to appease the working classes lest they went one step further and overthrew them.

It is important that this is re-addressed otherwise history will be distorted from a view that the establishment want the world to be seen as.  Furthermore the real life stories such as the 1911 Transport strike is more dramatic and real than the lavish period dramas of Victoria biting her lip as she has to make a tough decision.

A drama like this would be more realistic of a Britain whose inhabitants were in poverty and fought for their basic rights.  The likes of Downton Abbey, Victoria, and the Crown are more about portraying the aristocracy in a better light and only shining a light on history that is more pertinent to them or simply cannot be ignored.

Maybe just maybe someone will make a drama of the ordinary, brave people who fought and helped to establish the NHS, education, and better living conditions that we are used to today.  After all the ‘Great unrest,’ from 1910-14 appears to be now a forgotten period of history when it’s stories deserves to be as much celebrated as well as giving an understanding of the world that we are in now.