Teresa May the real life ‘Nicola Murray’

After having to deal with another calamitous mistake by Nicola Murray ‘the thick of it,’  Malcolm Tucker tells her ‘You’re a fucking omnishambles, that’s what you are. You’re like that coffee machine, you know: from bean to cup, you fuck up.’ After the complete mess that Theresa May has made of the 2017 election there are probably many Tories who share the same view of their hapless Prime Minister.

When Theresa May declared an election it was according to her to strengthen her hand in Brexit negotiations and to give her the mandate to ensure it was carried through.  It was also a chance to increase the Conservative majority and to take advantage of what they perceived was a Labour party in turmoil.

However rather than leading to a landslide it was to be a disastrous campaign that far from being a ‘strong and stable government,’ led to a hung parliament and to a weak and unstable minority government. Rather than Jeremy Corbyn looking out of his depth it is Theresa May drowning in a pool of her own incompetence.

The Labour party ran a first class campaign and although they didn’t win enough seats to form a government they did enough to make a lot of ground from the last election.  It would have been one almighty swing to Labour if they had romped home but it is progress especially as the Conservatives now rely on the DUP to form a government.

Although there was still a lot of media bias against Corbyn he was still shown to be able to connect with the public.  To paraphrase the West wing it was best to let ‘Jeremy to be Jeremy.’  He connected with the electorate, was pleasant, personable, and was seen to be comfortable answering questions from the media and the public.

This was in complete contrast Theresa May who looked shifty, uncomfortable, and only seemed to speak in soundbites.  Everything was stage-managed from the public events that she attended to the questions being vetted.  At one news conference a journalist in Cornwall was shown the door for daring to ask a third question.

Theresa May has consistently performed poorly at PMQ’s but she was to take this to a new level.  Meeting the electorate seemed to be an inconvenience and there seemed to be an arrogance that the public would accept anything.  The so-called ‘dementia tax,’ policy backfired spectacularly when the Conservative manifesto made plans to make people pay more of their own social care.  The policy caused anger because payments after death could eat into the inheritance of offspring whose parents were unlucky enough to suffer from a condition – like dementia – in which reliance on social care is inevitable.

It lead to a u-turn by Theresa May who scaled back proposals but considering that she was meant to be a decisive leader who wouldn’t stand any nonsense in brexit talks, made May look as though she would buckle under the slightest pressure.

The campaign by May led to personal insults against Corbyn and negativity throughout.  It seemed that so long as May got in her buzz words of ‘strong and stable government,’ that people would believe that she was the only one that could deliver this. However it just seemed stale and clichéd as Theresa May stood there nervously.  When forced to take questions May would take a sip of water to quench the nerves of being out of her comfort zone.  Again a trait that hardly inspires confidence.

In many respects Theresa May is one of those company middle-managers who are promoted way above their ability.  As a result they cause mayhem and damage before being quietly moved on.

By now it seemed to be as though the Conservatives were seeing Theresa May as a liability due to her consistent poor performances in public.  The decision to duck the leadership debate was poor judgement.  After all if you couldn’t comfortably argue your case and take questions how could you be deemed fit to negotiate in Brexit talks?  Inadvertently May raised Amber Rudd’s chances of taking her job by allowing her to take her place and performing well.

Of course the election was more than Brexit it was about the cuts in social service, education, the NHS and how austerity is affecting the ordinary person.   Labour’s manifesto seemed to an attractive and fair solution to bring about a fairer society.

As election day drew near it was the hope that people would allow the sound bites and uncertainty thrown about Corbyn to stick with May.  Indeed many thought the Conservatives would still win comfortably despite the poor performances of May.  They were to be shocked when the final poll at 10pm on the 8th June 2017 rightly declared it be a hung parliament.

Labour may not have won enough to govern but they had made progress whereas Theresa May had spectacularly shot herself in the foot.  She had called an election believing it to be a formality and a chance to increase the Conservative majority in parliament.  Instead they lost seats and rather than bringing ‘strong and stable,’ May now presides over a minority government with less MPs.  Now they have to rely on the DUP which will bring about other issues.  Furthermore due to the lack of a majority May will have to deal with factions within her own party.  Rather than talking about moving forward it is now about uncertainty and when another election will be called.

Even as the ceiling has come crashing down and with bits of plaster in her hair, May still acted as though she had won a massive majority.  Despite the clichéd key words that had fallen as flat as a fart at a funeral, May still couldn’t help herself declaring the coalition with the DUP as bringing a ‘government of certainty.’  It was as though May was hoping to hoodwink the public that everything was fine rather than being an almighty mess through her own making.

This didn’t go down with the party faithful especially the candidates who had lost seats.  To not even acknowledge that this was a massive set back was another poor error of judgement.  However Theresa May calamitous flounders around like Nicola Murray that it can’t be long before she declares a policy for ‘every day bat people.’

Prior to this election many felt that it would be the end of Jeremy Corbyn as leader of the Labour party.  Many were probably already writing his obituary.  Instead it is a dazed, incompetent, and weak Theresa May who staggers on after losing all credibility.

After this poor performance and weak leadership it surely can’t be long before Theresa May steps aside.  Whether she makes that decision or is forced out will be played out in the coming months. There really is no way that May can continue as Prime Minister.  She looks weak and above all has been shown to be incompetent that another election probably seems certain by the end of the year.

 

 

 

Liverpool 2016/17 season review

Expectations are always high at the beginning of the season.  This was especially so after Klopp had led Liverpool to the League  and Europa cup finals in the 2015/16 season.

The omens also looked good.  At the beginning of the 1987/88 season Liverpool played Arsenal away on the opening day and just like that year there was a delay.  This time it was due to the completion of the new main stand rather than a collapsed sewer under the Kop.  Nevertheless it could be seen as a positive omen.

Being a season ticket holder in the new main stand it certainly lived up to expectations.  Although high up the view was excellent especially as the seat is on the half way line.  It gave the advantage of being able to see better the teams shape and build up than my previous seat in the Kop.  There was also the novelty of leg room and the acoustics of the stand was spot on as the noise can carry when the fans are in full voice.

Without European football for that season it was wondered whether the benefit of playing no mid-week games would have the same effect as it did for the 2013/14 season.  Liverpool of course narrowly missing out on the league to Manchester City.  Certainly Liverpool got off to a flier beating Arsenal 4-3 a dramatic game whilst the first home game of the season a 5.30pm kickoff against Leicester saw the champions thrashed 4-1.

The football was a game of intense high pressing with teams unable to cope against Liverpool’s attack.  Mane the new signing from Southampton looked scintillating in attack whilst the likes of Lallana and Firmino came on in leaps and bounds.  Previously they had been inconsistent and only showed flashes of what they could do achieve.  This season they were not only consistent but players that Liverpool relied on.

A brief surge to the top made fans dream but unlike the 87/88 team the defence and overall quality was not as good and consistent that it needs to be.  With injuries to key players at certain points in the season and Mane unavailable due to the African cup of nations there was not the depth in squad to cover.  Furthermore the opposition had learnt to stifle Liverpool by playing deep, restricting space and making use of Liverpool’s vulnerability at set-pieces to score.  The bench also offered no real options in terms of changing things tactically on the pitch.

Indeed Liverpool’s record against the other top six clubs was impressive.  Mainly because with the likes of Spurs and Arsenal who were more open benefitted Liverpool who with their pressing game were able to exploit the spaces left open.

The realistic hope of course was that Liverpool would win one of the domestic trophies and finish within the top four.  Liverpool disappointingly were beaten 2-1 at home against  Wolves in the fourth round of the FA cup.  It appeared that Klopp had overestimated the quality of the overall squad as they struggled to get the better of the Championship side.  In the league cup Southampton beat Liverpool 2-0 over both legs which just left the pursuit for a top four spot.

Despite a few stumbles Liverpool managed to make it over the line although if they had not dropped points against the likes of Southampton, Palace, and Bournemouth they may have just finished third and avoid the Champions league qualifier.

Nevertheless for a fourth placed finish it was still achieved with a high points total of seventy-six that would have won Liverpool the league twenty years ago.  Although not spectacular it is an improvement in the league.   Prior to the season you would expect Liverpool to finish between fourth and six if you were judging on what was spent.

There have been highlights namely the back to back wins against Arsenal, beating Leicester, and Everton.  Then of course there is Emre Can’s spectacular goal against Watford.

Mane has deservedly won the Liverpool player of the year and has been sorely missed when he has been absent.  It is also worth noting that Simon Mignolet has improved significantly this season after temporally being dislodged by Karius.  Unless a keeper of the quality of Pepe Reina becomes available then a goalkeeper is no longer the priority that it once was last year.

The only negatives this season from me has been the atmosphere at games.  It is unfortunately one of the changing facets of football that the ordinary fan is being priced out.  There are more corporate tickets and with the likes of Liverpool, Manchester United, and Arsenal it is more being seen at the event rather than love for the team or even the sport.

When you have the likes of two middle-aged men in front of you more intent on showing each other pictures on their mobiles than watching Liverpool play Manchester City it is going to affect the atmosphere.  Then there is the panic if Liverpool are not one up within ten minutes that shows up the sense of entitlement some fans feel.  Silly comments are thrown about before going down to get a pint five minutes before half time and then sodding off in the 85th minute.

Of course you want Liverpool to win but there has to be a sense of realism.  This after all is not 1984 even if the outside world seems to portray Orwell’s dystopian novel.  Getting behind the team is crucial and again can help the team to snatch a result.  The sound of seats slamming as Palace scored the second rather than the sound of Liverpool fans roaring the team to grab an equalizer in the last ten minutes is galling.

Unbelievably there were a few idiots that booed after the draw against Southampton.  Was it frustrating?  Of course it was but the team had given everything and it just didn’t happen on the day.  We had a limited squad with a lack of options on the bench.  You can only do so much and Klopp has got the best out of the team.

For next season and certainly with European football the squad does have to be strengthened.  The defence certainly needs to be improved.  At times they seem shaky and certainly at set pieces seem more vulnerable in conceding a goal.  The team does need to learn to defend as it breeds that confidence with a solid defence.  A centre-half and left back are certainly required.

Another midfielder preferably someone with a bit of pace and guile, and another forward have to be priorities.  Besides this we also need more options to choose from the bench especially when it is difficult breaking teams down.

I am certainly not expecting a marquee signing as this isn’t the way the Fenway group do business but I certainly expect some activity as the defence and size of the squad were issues that became apparent during the season.

This season has seen Liverpool move in the right direction.  If they can keep hold of Coutinho and get Emre Can to extend his contract then it will be beneficial.  Can of course holds divisive opinions but I would say that he does has the ability to be one of the top midfielders in the game.  Critics seem to forget that he is only young.  He can at times be sloppy but he never hides and always tries to make the correct pass or make something happen.  If Can leaves Liverpool I certainly don’t want to regret watching his talent benefit another club.

With European football back and hopefully champions league it will be an exciting season which will hopefully see Liverpool win a trophy.  Above all though I want to enjoy the thrill that the likes of last season’s Europa cup run, the title tilt of 2013/14 and certainly wouldn’t say no to a similar season in the Champions league of 2004/05.

Football can be frustrating and bring despair.  At times you question your own sanity watching a dull 0-0 on a cold January night but games like Istanbul and last season’s game against Dortmund make it all worth while.  Sometimes you have to suffer a bit of misery to appreciate the joy.  That is after all what football is to the majority of supporters.

Above all though I just want to enjoy watching the mighty reds and hopefully experience another rollercoaster journey that Liverpool are good at doing.

The countdown begins to the 2017/18 season!

 

 

 

 

Why there is no such thing as impartial media as the 2017 election shows.

With the general election only a few weeks away it is just as well Teresa May has got the media on her side.  So far her performances on the campaign trail have been poor.  Journalists have had to submit questions with a local reporter being swiftly shown the door in Devon for having the audacity to ask one extra question that wasn’t on the list.

Everything has been stage-managed with May even playing the jingoism card by accusing the EU of trying to interfere because they fear how she won’t stand any nonsense from those pesky Europeans.

The Conservative sound bites have also had the impact of a clumsy theatrical dive of a footballer trying to get a penalty as May once again gets ‘strong and stable government,’ into a sentence with the shout of bingo as the final cliché has been spoken.

Then there is the embarrassment of the hacking of the NHS computer database with the hackers holding personal details to ransom.  If it had been a Labour government it would have been a guarantee that they would have got crucified especially as they were fully aware that the security was weak but were not prepared to stump up the cash.

Journalism and the news media have been far from impartial for it to be to be too much of a surprise.  There are too many vested interests with media moguls such as Rupert Murdoch intent on their news outlet to press forward their views on the public.  If there is anything that goes or threatens their interests then you can guarantee an attack on that person or institution.

The attacks on Jeremy Corbyn are nothing short of sinister even before this campaign.  It is as though the likes of Murdoch won’t take any chances by continually attacking him.  Whether its questioning his patriotism by not bowing properly enough, labelling him as weak, or simply Corbyn’s dress sense it has been a drip, drip, drip attack that people slowly absorb.  Headlines such as ‘Corb snubs the Queen,’ or even the subtle Sunday Times headline ‘Corbyn sparks Labour civil war,’ or ‘Corbyn Union pals pledge strike chaos,’ all give the impression of someone struggling to keep control and not knowing what they are doing.  Of course you will hear people say that you can’t trust the papers but with the constant negative headlines there are some that believe that they must be some truth.

Even the media that profess to be left such as the Guardian can’t help but be aghast and look at ways at undermining Corbyn.  The likes of Polly Toynbee who wail at the lack of leadership and his policies not being credible to Nick Cohen throwing his toys out of the pram due to the audacity of Labour members daring to vote for who they want as leader and not his choice is breathtaking.  Again it gives the impression that Corbyn is a bumbling fool that doesn’t live in the real world.

The slightest mistake or controversy is magnified and used to hammer the fact that Corbyn is unsuitable to be Prime Minister.  Take for example Diane Abbott getting her figures completely messed up about the cost of extra Policing if Labour was elected Government.  It was further fuel that a Labour government didn’t really know it’s figures and would not only deliver but put the country into debt.  Recently Abbott was also mocked by getting lost on stage after addressing the Police federation conference.

Nothing though was made of Amber Rudd being openly mocked by Police at the same federation conference when claiming officers were on £40,000 a year when questioned about Officers using food banks.  To make matters worse Rudd dug the hole further by trying to deflect the blame by saying ‘so I’m told,’ despite it being her business being the Home Secretary.

Philip Hammond also made another blunder by getting the cost of HS2 wrong by £20 billion on BBC’s radio 4 Today programme after ironically questioning Labour’s figures.  Again nothing major was made of this gaffe.  Nothing about whether you can trust a May government when her chancellor can’t even get his figures right or kindling the hysteria that a Conservative government would be incompetent.  Instead it was casually brushed over.

It has had the required impact on the British public who view Jeremy Corbyn as an unreliable maverick at best.  Take for example a member of the public who was asked what they thought of Labour’s manifesto.  The man in question liked the policies and believed it would benefit the UK as a whole.  However when the journalist asked if that meant he would be voting Labour the man paused before saying ‘I won’t be voting for that Jeremy Corbyn he’s not suitable to be leader,’ and with that casually strolled off.

That member of the public is not the only person to hold that type of view.  One person stated that they ‘didn’t like that Jeremy Corbyn.’  When asked why they were unable to elaborate or provide a reasonable argument as to why Jeremy Corbyn is unsuitable to be leader they couldn’t as their opinion had been influenced by the newspaper headlines.

The media has from the outset done everything to undermine Corbyn.  From the brash, vulgar, sneering headlines questioning Corbyn’s patriotism to subtly implying that Corbyn does not have a clue and will plunge the country into chaos if he is handed the keys to number ten.

Even the tones of the questions at Labour MPs or officials are constantly negative despite the responses.  It will turn to the cost and querying as to whether it is realistic.  The Conservatives are of course asked difficult questions but then spun to something where they can talk positively about another policy.

Of course Jeremy Corbyn should be held accountable and questioned by the media as should Teresa May and other political leaders.  However newspapers and other media outlets should be impartial and doing their job of reporting and presenting the facts to the public.  There equally should be none of this sensational nonsense that somehow makes every tragedy somehow a drama.

A news outlets job should be to present the facts and let people decide from their reports.  Everyone in a position of responsibility should be robustly challenged and there should certainly be none of the mocking and biased headlines that are casually fired at will.  If there was true impartiality then a newspaper or any media outlet would not declare any support for any of the political parties.  The fact that they do and this includes the media professing to be left-wing shows that they have a vested interest.

For those considered to be part of the establishment or simply rich the Conservative party represents their interests.  Consequently they ensure that the media outlets that they own represent their views.  If Corbyn is perceived as a threat then they will do their utmost to convince people that he can’t be trusted.

Even when Labour lands a significant blow such as Emily Thornberry embarrassing Michael Fallon on Andrew Marr, (Thornberry reminded him that he was present at a reception celebrating the election of the Syrian President Assad in 2007) it doesn’t warrant much of a mention within the press.

In this day and age with the internet and social media making people more aware than previously of what is happening in the world you would think there would be more cynicism regarding the press.  However with the constant negative headlines whether it is hearing the news on TV, radio, or newspaper, people are influenced and with regards to Corbyn feel that he is to be mistrusted.

The media is very much an important tool and if you have it behind you then it can help the most mediocre politician.  Crude as Teresa May’s slogans are the constant drip, drip of the Conservatives providing a ‘strong and stable government,’ whilst ‘Corbyn is ineffective,’ will seep into people’s minds come polling day.

It is a pity that we don’t have a real fair and impartial press that holds all political parties to account thus allowing the population to make a considered judgement from the facts.  Certainly the media in its current guise cannot be relied on.

 


The quiet Don – Revie’s legacy to football

‘When Eddie Gray plays on snow, he doesn’t leave any footprints,’ Don Revie once declared of his Leeds winger.  In some respects and with hindsight he could have been talking about how his achievements in football have been criminally overlooked.

 Despite the years passing there are still books, articles, and documentaries that fondly wax lyrically about the success and legacy of Bill Shankly, Matt Busby, Jock Stein, and Brian Clough.

Yet despite the success of Leeds and being the man who put the Yorkshire club on the map Revie’s achievements are now in the shadows.  Even when Revie’s name is mentioned it has negative connotations that gloss over his talents.

When Don Revie took charge as player-manager in March 1961 of a struggling Leeds United side there was no indication or apparent ambition for the success that was to come.  Rugby league and even cricket were the main sports of West Yorkshire with football not even coming into the equation.  By the end of the decade this was to change with Leeds becoming one of the most feared and dominant sides of English football.

Don Revie was born in Middlesbrough although his playing career came with  Leicester City with stints at Hull City, Manchester City, and Sunderland.  He was by all accounts a gifted footballer with his successful years at Manchester City winning the FA cup in 1956 against Birmingham City.  Revie’s performance earned him the man of the match whilst the year before he was named the football writers of the year award.

It was Bill Lambton the then Leeds Manager in 1958 that signed Revie but under the new manager Jack Taylor was part of the side that was relegated in 1960.  A year later the job was offered to Revie.  Not because they had seen something special with Revie simply because nobody was attracted to the job due to the financial problems of the club.  Furthermore Don Revie was cheap although if Bournemouth had been prepared to pay the £6000 to sign Revie as player-manager then the history of Leeds could quite easily have been different.

One of the first things that Revie brought about was to bring about a family spirit with everyone from the cleaners to the club directors all pulling together.  He personally ensured that he knew everybody’s name whilst having a daily chat.

The referee Jack Taylor once noted that Revie gave money to the cleaners to put on the horses.  If they won they were twice as happy and even if they lost they were still happy at the gesture.  It was something that Revie succeeded at as it made everybody feel part and proud of the club.  Furthermore it brought a sense of togetherness and for Revie it was to bring about a family feeling to the place.

Another change that Revie instigated was that all players be it the first team, reserves, or B sides would all play the same system.  Revie told the Yorkshire Post that ‘any players moving from one team to another will know just what is wanted.’

Bill Shankly’s Liverpool and Guardiola’s Barcelona operated a similar system in the belief it would be easy for players to step up when required.

Revie was left with a very poor side and a club that was in financial difficulties.  Most of the side was compromised of journeymen footballers with the only players of exception being Billy Bremner who at seventeen had just broke into the first team, John McCole whose goals were important to Leeds and Jack Charlton.  The latter was seen as more trouble than he was worth whose surliness and open objection to anything that annoyed him made supporters wonder if he would be the first to go.

The only other notable legacy from Jack Taylor’s time as manager was his backroom staff of Syd Owens and Les Cocker.  Under Revie they would help Leeds to become one of the fittest teams in the league as well as analysing young players and helping them to improve.  Both were hard task masters but the likes of Bremner and Eddie Gray would later appreciate their efforts.

Revie that year managed to keep Leeds up but it was still going to be another two tough years before the Yorkshire club would start to make any improvement.  Even Revie admitted that towards the end of his first full season in charge that he half expected to be sacked.

With funds limited Revie was restricted with the players that he could bring in.  Two of the most notable signings was Bobby Collins from Everton for £25,000 and Albert Johannsen.  The latter was signed on the recommendation of a South African school teacher with Revie only having to pay his fare from Johannesburg.

Although Johannsen was to be inconsistent during his time at Leeds he did bring a touch of glamour and skill in those early days.  Bobby Collins though was to be very influential.  His dogged determination in never giving up or accepting second best seeped amongst Collins younger more impressionable teammates.  It was to be this determination that would become part of Revie’s Leeds DNA.

There was no instant Midas touch with Revie even experimenting by using Jack Charlton as a centre-forward.  It was more a case of hoping lightning would strike twice as the club legend John Charles had swapped defence for attack which had led to him being one of the most feared forwards in Europe.  However Charlton was no Charles and although he scored twelve goals in twenty games he was quietly put back in defence by Christmas 1961.  Most of the goals came from set-pieces but more importantly Charlton was like a fish out of water and didn’t know what he was doing.

One of the influences on Revie was Matt Busby who had advised that if possible to give youth a chance.  It wasn’t just because coming through the ranks that they would show more loyalty and affinity (especially if they were from the local area) but that at a young age they would be more impressionable.  Unlike seasoned pro’s they would be willing to listen, less likely to question, and not pick up bad habits from previous clubs.

The likes of Eddie Gray, Peter Lorimer, Norman Hunter, Gary Sprake,  Rod Johnson, and Paul Reaney to name but a few all came through the ranks and all were to play a major part in the future for Leeds.  With Johnny Giles signed from Manchester United for £33,000 Leeds United were to become quite formidable.

Don Revie brought about another subtle difference to Leeds United by throwing a pre-season party with directors, staff, players, and wives.  Aware of his wife Elsie’s and his own isolation as a player he sought again to bring everyone together and made them feel involved.  Above all he wanted a family feeling about the place as he spoke of their importance to the club.  Revie was aware that domestic harmony could help a player feel more settled and not disrupt his form if his house was an unhappy one.

Over the years Don Revie would in some respects become a Father figure.  He would even make visits, give birthday and Christmas cards, flowers presents to the wives and children.  All of this was appreciated and as they too were made to feel part of the club their devotion to Revie also grew.  In many ways he was like the Godfather’s Vito Corleone.  A man who showed and expected loyalty but equally be tough if required.

To show that this was a new Leeds United and one that would be very much moulded in Don Revie’s image he decided to ditch the yellow and blue strip with Leeds to play in an all white strip.  That there was no dissent from supporters or the board about the change of colours showed the lack of interest within the West Yorkshire area.  Nevertheless it was the start of Revie building Leeds to what we know now.

Although Leeds might have looked similar to Real Madrid that was as close as they got to the Spanish giants in Revie’s first two full seasons in charge.  Slowly though things started to change especially as the youngsters like Bremner, Gray, Lorimer, and Norman Hunter started to shine.  Also the 1963-64 season that they clinched promotion the signing of Manchester United Johnny Giles gave them that edge with the brutal determination of Bobby Collins.

There was also a different to approach with how Revie selected youngsters.  Unlike other managers the size of a player did not bother him.  So long as they had the ability, desire, and willingness to work then they would be given a chance.

Revie also had an eye to get the best out of players by changing their positions.  Terry Cooper was converted from a winger to a left back, Eddie Gray from central midfielder to winger, with Bremner and Giles converting from wingers to central midfielders.

It was now a different Leeds in terms of talent, attitude, professionalism, and desire to be the best.  Johnny Giles observed in Eamon Dunphy’s ‘A strange kind of glory,’ that ‘people were consciously thinking about the game, small things like throw-ins, free-kicks, and corner-kicks were discussed and planned.  People were intent on doing something.  Nothing was ever left to chance.’

Critics at the time may have derided and even mocked the infamous dossiers that Revie had drawn up about the opposition but he was ahead of his time.  The reports drawn by Cocker, Owen, and Lindley were so meticulous that they would observe whether the goalkeeper was a flapper or a catcher or whether the right half could accurately pass the ball across his body to the left-wing whilst running right.

On the Friday the reserves would copy the style and formation of the opposition that Leeds were due to play on the Saturday.  By the end of the session the selected XI would know by heart the movement and as a result be able to anticipate the moves of the opposition for real on match day.

In football today that is nothing new with the endless stats and coaching geared towards dealing with the opposition at the weekend that it would be expected at any professional club.  Back in the 60’s it was more about putting out your XI and letting your rival worry about you.

The work on Leeds fitness was to also have an impact especially as Revie had them playing a high tempo pressing game.  In the ‘Unforgiven,’ by Bagchi and Rogerson they quote Bremner saying how Collins would dictate the game by making ‘them go like bombs for a ten minute spell.  Then he would tell them to tighten up again before going at them again.’

With teams not as fit and being unable to cope it was no surprise that Revie had managed to ensure that Leeds finally gained promotion in the 1963-64 season.  As the good work started to pay dividends it was to be start of the glory years for Leeds United.

Leeds first season in the top flight unerringly summed up the Revie era in terms of being so close but yet so far.  The West Yorkshire side almost won what would have been an incredible double but lost out to Manchester United who won the league due to having a superior goal difference to Leeds.  A week later they lost 2-1 in extra time to Bill Shankly’s Liverpool who won the FA cup for the first time in their history.  Nevertheless it was a fantastic season for a team that had spent most of its history in the doldrums.

It was though a season that Leeds started to earn their reputation as being ‘cynical cheats,’ who fouled, harassed the referee, and looked to gain any advantage by hook or by crook.  George Best recalled walking down the tunnel at Old Trafford ‘I felt a terrific pain in my right calf as someone kicked me with brute force.  I turned.  It was Bobby Collins.  ‘And that’s just for starters Bestie.’  He snarled.

Earlier that season brutal challenges by the likes of Giles and Hunter caused outrage at Goodison that led to the Everton crowd making a pitch invasion.  The crowd was cleared with Leeds winning 1-0 which later led to the Yorkshire Post’s Ian Guild description of the match as ‘a disgrace to football.’

The question and indeed suspicion was on whether Don Revie instructed his players to try to win at any cost even it meant fouling or cheating.  There probably is some truth that Leeds pushed the rules with Johnny Giles admitting ‘I have certainly done things on the football pitch that I am embarrassed about now.’  But as he then stated ‘one has to put them into the football climate that existed then.’

Certainly in that period in the 1960s and 1970s it was a more brutal game.  Going in hard and trying to intimidate your opponent was seen as fair game.  Nearly every team had an enforcer whether it was Manchester United’s Nobby Stiles, Anfield Iron’s Tommy Smith who threatened to ‘break player’s backs,’ or Chelsea’s Ron ‘Chopper,’ Harris.

Despite the notoriety of these players they in many ways gained cult and legendary status of when football ‘was a man’s game.’  Yet with Norman ‘bites yer legs,’ Hunter and Leeds they were viewed as the villains of football.

In some respects there was always a suspicion that Don Revie embraced the dark arts a bit too much.  That he was like a grand wizard who became bad in his pursuit of glory.  From hiring a gypsy to eradicate an alleged curse that had been placed on Elland road to wearing his blue suit that became so threadbare that his underwear could be seen in bright light.

Revie himself openly admitted to being superstitious and following a routine that involved the ‘same lucky tie, one or two lucky charms in my pocket. I walk to the traffic lights every morning, turn round and walk back to the hotel.’

There was of course the famous bird phobia that saw Revie remove the club’s owl badge to the familiar LUFC, having three puffs on a cigar,  before sucking on a mint for one minute, and then chewing gum for ten.

Again superstition although ridiculous is very much part of football.  Being an unpredictable game it gives the person a feeling of control that by following a certain ritual that they will gain some good luck which may win the game.

However the dark shadow or the smearing of Revie’s achievements is that he was alleged to have offered bribes for teams to go easy.  Bob Stokoe who managed Sunderland to a FA cup shock in 1973 against Leeds told the Daily Mirror that during his time as Bury manager in 1962 that Revie had offered him £500 to throw the match.

None of this has ever been proven and as Bagchi and Rogerson point out in the ‘Unforgiven,’ how did Revie on £38 a week with a club that was struggling financially find that amount?  Furthermore why did Stokoe wait fourteen years to tell his story and then for the princely sum of £14,000?

The accusations didn’t stop there with Wolves Mike O’Grady claiming that he had been paid as a fixer in 1973 to offer his teammates £1000 a man to throw their game against Leeds and ensure that they won the title.  Again none of this was substantiated with Revie being cleared by the Police and Bremner winning a libel case when accused of offering the bribes.

Again it all added to the media trying to paint Revie as some kind of super villain.  Leeds achievements would be tarnished because of this despite being one of the best footballing sides in the mid-seventies.

Maybe it was because Leeds were insular with Revie encouraging ‘us against the world,’ mentality.  This was no different to the tactics that Alex Ferguson encouraged at Manchester United.  It brought a sense of unity and loyalty as well as a determination to knock their critic’s noses out of joint and enjoy the discomfort of the critics having to acknowledge that they were the best.  Yet whereas Ferguson is lauded it is seen as another stick to beat Leeds with.

Revie’s man management was also second to none.  He knew when to put an arm around a player and when they needed a proverbial kick up the backside.  Nothing was left to chance as Revie ensured that he knew the character of all his players.  Furthermore he only wanted players who would fit into the work ethic of the club.

Europe was another learning curve for Revie who quickly realised that discipline and organisation was a key to being successful.  During the Inter Cities Fairs cup Leeds used their strength to hit teams on the break and in turn to be able to absorb the pressure.  Their mental strength was also second to none with the Italian press admiring their character and not letting the awful leg break of Bobby Collins by Torino’s Poletti to affect them by seeing the game through and winning the tie.

Breaking your duck in winning your first trophy is always the hardest but despite a turgid match Leeds beat Arsenal 1-0 at Wembley to win the League cup.  In a sense it gave Leeds a taste of victory and the belief that they could achieve more.  Revie was more than aware of this as he showed a rare expression of delight by joining his celebrating team on the pitch.

More success was to come as Leeds went a step further by clinching the Inter City Fairs cup by beating the Hungarian Ferencvaros 1-0 over two legs.  There was a significant delay due to the Warsaw pact invasion of Czechoslovakia with the possibility of the game being called off.  Again the professionalism and organisation was enough to see Leeds through against a team whom Shankly and Busby viewed as one of the best teams in Europe.

The league championship with its long, arduous season that decided the best team in England now sauntered into view for Leeds.  They had finished runners-up to Liverpool in the 1965-66 season but wanted to go that one step further.  By now Leeds had firmly established themselves as a difficult team but needed a title to show that they were not pretenders.

It was to the 1968-69 season when Revie’s Leeds would clinch the clubs first championship in their history.   The team was now maturing with the average age of the squad being around twenty-five.  Besides which Leeds with the two cup wins now had a taste for trophies.  Something that Revie wanted to encourage.

Billy Bremner recalls how Don Revie ensured that the desire and fire to keep winning trophies and not to rest on their laurels was to continually set new challenges.  That was to win the league.  ‘When you haven’t won anything, you’re delighted to win something; but as soon as a new challenge is offered, you have to climb higher.  And so we climbed that bit higher in going for the league.’

It was to be a culmination of Leeds gaining experience and knowing how each other played.  There was in some respects a communal style to Leeds play.  For example Hunter, Cooper, and Gray formed the left side, working the ball in triangles and quadrilaterals between them before seizing on any space given to initiate an attack.  Charlton, Reaney, Bremner, and O’Grady replicated this on the right.

Bremner and Giles having the ability to hit the killer pass once the opposition had committed themselves too far forward.

All season Leeds had stretched the opposition and with their superior fitness that the West Yorkshire side were easily the best side in the league that season.

The title was clinched at Anfield after a 0-0 draw against Liverpool.  It was to be a night were Leeds also felt that they had finally achieved the recognition that they deserved.

Revie had instructed his team that if they won the league on the night then they were to go forward and acknowledge the Kop.  Bremner was unsure but duly led his players towards the goal with the crowd becoming silent.  There was a slight pause before the crowd chanted ‘Champions,’ and applauded the Leeds team for their achievements for that season.

With Shankly declaring them worthy champions it felt for Leeds that they were finally being recognised for their footballing abilities.  After so many years of being branded villains they were now being hailed for their football.

The following season Leeds didn’t let their laurels slip as Leeds chased a unique treble of the league, European, and FA cup.  Bagchi and Rogerson in ‘the unforgiven,’ believe fixture congestion and the lack of help from the league authorities in terms of re-arranging fixtures meant that Revie had to prioritize which trophies they wanted to go for.

In what seems strange in this Premier league obsessed era, Leeds had made winning the European and FA cup more of a priority as these were not only trophies that they had never won but were also equally prestigious.

Leeds with seven games remaining was top of the league but decided that in order to boost their chances of success had to rest players.  For the remaining six games the Leeds team were a mixture of reserves and experienced players which earned the club a five thousand pound fine from the football league.

Sadly for the West Yorkshire club they were to fall short.  It didn’t help that it took three games to beat Manchester United to reach the 1970 FA cup final in order to play Chelsea.  The semi-final against Celtic was to see Leeds comprehensively beaten 3-0 over two legs with the Glaswegian side to later lose 2-1 to Feyenoord in extra time in the final.

That was to be a fate that Leeds would suffer in a replay at Old Trafford as Webb snatched the winner to lift the cup for Chelsea.  It was to be a final remembered for two things.  A poor pitch due to allowing the horse of the year show prior to the final and the brutal tackling and fouling from both sides.

Due to picking up only three points from the final six games the league had duly been surrendered to Everton who were proclaimed the football league champions for the 1969-70 season.

It was a disappointing season but Leeds maturity and confidence in their own abilities as Revie allowed the shackles off showed that Leeds were one of the top footballing sides who would be favourites for all the major honours in the years to come.

Yet they would become more known for choking at the crucial moments.  Some of it was down to appalling decisions made against Leeds whilst other times the West Yorkshire failed to play to their ability.

A fifth round tie away to fourth division Colchester should have not really posed any problems for Leeds.  Instead they found themselves three-nil down and despite pulling two goals were unable to snatch an equaliser.  Sprake was held responsible for the three goals and indeed was seen as the weak link of the team.

Despite the shock cup exit the league was still on.  However another infamous game against West Bromwich Albion with the referee Ray Tinkler’s poor performance to have repercussions’ on Leeds title challenge.  Albion’s Colin Suggett was quite clearly offside with Brown looking for the decision only to continue and square the ball to Astle who put the ball into the back of the net and winning the two points for West Brom.

Barry Davies the match of the day commentator was incredulous and declared that ‘Leeds will go mad and they have every right to be.’  It provoked a reaction from the Leeds players which also ignited crowd trouble who were outraged at the decision.

Arsenal would go on to clinch the league by one point with Ray Kennedy netting the winner against Spurs at White Hart lane.  Again Leeds would be the bridesmaid in terms of the league although they didn’t end that season empty ended as they won the Inter Cities fairs cup on away goals after drawing 3-3 on aggregate but crucially drew 2-2 away in Turin.

It was becoming a familiar occurrence as Leeds once again blew the chance of winning the double in the 71-72 season.  They played some scintillating that year with the highlight being Leeds torturing Southampton with keep ball after being 7-0 up.  As Barry Davies said in admiration it was ‘cruel,’ but at the same time it was breath-taking football with the flicks and back heels as Leeds played a match version of ‘piggy in the middle,’ by keeping hold of the ball.

Leeds it seemed was head and shoulders above everyone else.  The FA cup was lifted for the first time in their history as they beat Arsenal 1-0 who hoped to retain the trophy.  The double it seemed was a certainty as Leeds only needed a point away to Wolves.  However two days after the cup final Leeds were to be denied and frustrated by the referee yet again.  There were three penalty shouts with a blatant handball to deny Allan Clarke.  Wolves won the game 2-1 and with Liverpool failing to beat Arsenal at Highbury with a Toshack goal ruled out for offside, Brian Clough’s Derby County won the league whilst on the beach in Majorca.

Heartache seemed to be the Leeds way and the 1972-73 season was to be no different.  Although they were not in any contention to win the league that season Leeds again reached the FA cup final against second division Sunderland and the European Cup Winners Cup against AC Milan.

Critics assumed that Sunderland had no chance and that Leeds would triumph over the North East side.  It was a case of how many would Leeds would win by.  Instead Leeds failed to deal with the corner with Porterfield gaining legendary status by striking the ball into the back of the net.

Leeds would put the pressure on Sunderland with Cherry’s diving header which was parried away by Montgomery straight to Lorimer who almost equalised only to be thwarted by Montgomery who parried it against the crossbar.  Yet again it was not be Leeds day and to be remembered for all the wrong reasons as David beat the unpopular Goliath.

A 1-0 defeat to AC Milan in the Cup Winners Cup final meant that Leeds ended the season empty-handed.  There was a feeling that Leeds had been cheated following the Greek referee Christos Michas being suspended by UEFA and his own federation due to some dubious decisions against Leeds.

There are numerous theories as to why Leeds United kept falling short at the crucial moments.  Some cited poor refereeing decisions and Hardaker of the football league who was believed to have disliked Leeds due to their reputation.  With fixtures piling up due to replays or poor weather and the football league refused to accommodate or assist Leeds in order to give them enough recovery time between games.

At times with the matches piling up there were key players who were injured and in the case of the Wolves game both Clarke and Giles had pain killing injections certainly couldn’t have helped.  With so many irons in the fire so to speak it meant that the Leeds players were on their last legs and just couldn’t carry themselves over the line when required.

Some even questioned whether Revie thought too much about the opposition and whether that anxiety transmitted to the players.  Dave Watson the Sunderland centre-half stated that he thought the Leeds players were very subdued in their interviews prior to the Cup final.  It could also be said that at times Revie brought the squad for big matches too early and rather than be distracted by every day life were left to brood on the game.

Perhaps it was a mix of all and more than likely being involved in so many big competitions stretched the squad to their limit.  Revie certainly knew his players and he had managed to channel that comradeship amongst the team and supporters.

The 1973-74 season was to be Revie’s last as he left Leeds to take the job of England manager.  However Leeds ended it as champions after going twenty-nine games unbeaten.

Some wondered if Revie took the England job on as he couldn’t bear to break up his ageing Leeds team.  The fact of the matter is that Revie had already got itchy feet and had got caught going for possible talks to become the Everton manager in 1973 when he had got lost and had to ask directions.  Money was another insecurity of Revie with the attraction of more money at Everton whetting his initial interest before deciding to stay at Leeds.

The England job was not to be a success as he was unable to replicate the team and family spirit that he harnessed at Leeds United.  Some players mocked his carpet bowls and ideas.  Revie himself seemed uncomfortable in dealing with the politics of International football and seemed to miss the day-to-day coaching that club football brought.

With England performing poorly and unlikely to qualify for the world cup qualifiers Don Revie decided to quit the job and took up a post offered by the UAE.  Despite the FA having approached Bobby Robson in order to replace Revie they suspended him for ten years.  Although Revie won on a Court appeal he was never to work in English football again with only coaching stints at other middle-east countries.

Due to the manner of Revie’s England resignation and the money being offered to manage the UAE national side he was branded a mercenary with his reputation never Don_Revie_and_Billy_Bremnerrecovering.

Leeds too was never to be the same side that they were under Revie.  In what was a bizarre decision they appointed Revie’s arch critic and nemesis Brian Clough to re-build the team.  With Clough’s brash manner and telling the players ‘to put all their medals in the bin as they had won them through cheating,’ it was never going to end well.  After forty-four days in charge Brian Clough was sacked as manager.

It was to be an end of an era despite reaching the European cup final in 1975 and losing to Bayern Munich.  Again there was to be much controversy and crowd trouble after the referee disallowed a Lorimer goal after initially pointing to the centre circle to indicate that a goal had been given.

As the years go by the achievements of Don Revie seem to fade into the background.  Nothing is mentioned of Don Revie physically building the Leeds United that we all know of now even if the past ten years or so have seen them back in the second tier.  It was Revie with hardly any resources that dragged and moulded Leeds United to be one of the most feared teams in English football.  Prior to his appointment Leeds were seen as a joke and in the shadow of rugby league.  Even Leeds current all white strip is down to Revie who decided to change the colours.

In terms of coaching and preparation Don Revie was ahead of his peers.  In today’s game in-depth analysis and preparation is all part of the game.  Revie in his dossiers and gearing training towards the opposition was so way ahead that at the time it was mocked by others within the English game.

Ironically in this day and age of mass marketing Revie was to be a pioneer by agreeing that Leeds became commercially involved with Paul Trevillion an illustrator more known for you are the ref.  There were track suits with player’s names, sock tags, and the Leeds wave as the players ran out two minutes early before kickoff and wave to each part of the ground who would shower them in applause and cheers.

Revie also encouraged youth and brought a collective spirit right throughout the club.  Everybody was part of this inner family that in turn brought about that resilience required to dig in and snatch a result no matter how badly they were playing.  In short everybody looked after each other.

Of course there was the cynicism and the intimidation that Revie’s Leeds did dish out.  There is no question that they rubbed up the opposition but other teams could just be as physical.  Leeds did push it to extremes and cynicism can be seen in the game today from the little clip, dive, time-wasting or harassing the referee.  Not that it makes it right but from a professional point of view it is about testing the boundaries in order to gain an advantage.

Maybe it’s because Revie didn’t have the statesman like aura of Matt Busby and Jock Stein or the charisma of Bill Shankly.  Neither did he have the soundbites of Brian Clough that the media lapped up.

In front of the cameras Revie always looked uneasy and seemingly shifty.  With the physical approach of Leeds it was easy to throw mud at Leeds with the unsubstantiated claims by Stokoe of offering bribes to go easy casting more dirt.  Revie with his superstition was all too easily cast as dabbling in the black arts of football.

It could be argued that there was an element of snobbery with Leeds not having the glamour of a London team or a charismatic star like Manchester United’s George Best.  They also equally refused to be in awe of anyone’s reputation and gave as good as they got.  Revie certainly showed this from a story given in the Unforgiven.  At an official FA dinner in 1976 Revie objected to the pompous Sir Harold Thompson referring to him by his surname.  Thompson haughtily replied ‘when I get to know you better Revie, I shall you call Don.  Quick as a flash Revie’s response was ‘when I get to know you better Thompson, I shall call you Sir Harold.’

Despite all the knocks and whether you think Don Revie’s reputation is deserved or not Revie’s Leeds United played attractive football.  Yes they could dish it out but they could play with aggression, skill, and pace which many teams of the time couldn’t cope with.  It was Revie who installed that discipline and ideas onto his team in the belief that it would get results.

Don Revie made and was Leeds United that even now his legacy still exists.  Furthermore he was also a pioneer and forward thinker who knew how to build and get the best out of his team.  It is for these reasons that Don Revie should be remembered alongside the greats of Shankly, Stein, and Busby.

 

Liverpool v C. Palace and why top four is still up for grabs

P170423-039-Liverpool_Crystal_Palace-e1492967314296Credit where its due even if it is through gritted teeth, Allardyce got his tactics spot on last Sunday as Palace beat Liverpool for the third year running at Anfield.  It was a game that was always going to be difficult given the erratic performances and results against the so-called lesser lights.  Even so with the finishing line and a top four spot in sight it was a home game that Liverpool needed to make it count.

Palace though were well organised and it was a yellow wall as they played deep and ensured that any space in the middle of the park was restricted.  With Mane unavailable due to injury there was no one to test the Palace defence with skill and pace.   Coutinho and Firmino may have  the guile and skill they were unable to find a way through the brickwall that was Palace’s defence.  Granted Origi is a player who has pace but he too found it hard to get into space.

It meant that the only options to Liverpool was to go wide but with the lack of height and a mass of yellow shirts, Palace were easily able to defend from set-pieces as you would expect from a Sam Allardyce side.

Despite this Liverpool managed to take the lead from a fantastic free kick from Coutinho.  This should have been the catalyst for Liverpool to kick on or at the very least hold onto the goal lead.  Palace would need to push further up the pitch and  leave more space for Liverpool to take hold of the game.

The Liverpool defence this season has been fragile and at times resembles a punch drunk boxer attempting to last the final round.  With only three minutes before half time Liverpool should have had the nous to keep it tight and simple.  Instead Lovren failed to react quickly to the ball as Cabaye gained posession as he raced down the right to play a ball for Benteke to score and equalise for Palace.

Once again there was frustration at Liverpool’s inability to defend and not tightening their hold on the match to ensure they got the result required.

The second half was reverting back to type for Palace who again ensured that Liverpool were not given any space to cause problems.  Another lapse at a set piece from a corner saw Benteke grab his second with a diving header.  With the lack of options on the bench Liverpool were unable to put anyone who could change the game.  Alexander-Arnold, Grujic, and Moreno were thrown on but it was more in the hope of fresh legs rather than any tactical acumen.

Liverpool didn’t look capable of breaking down Palace and despite the six minutes of injury time were unable to snatch a point.  It was a disappointing result following the two excellent away wins against Stoke City and West Bromwich Albion.

There have been a few moans that Liverpool have blown it especially with Man Utd winning 2-0 away to Burnley.  At present that is simply not the case.  Yes Liverpool have made it difficult for themselves but with Manchester United due to play Manchester City this Thursday at the Etihad they also have games against Tottenham and Arsenal.  City themselves also have to play Palace.

Looking at those fixtures there are still difficult games that United could drop points.  Added to which they have injuries to major players such as Ibrahimovic, Pogba, Herrera, Mata, and Smalling.  With the distraction of the Europa cup semi-final against Celta Vigo it is not a given that United will not drop points in their remaining games.

Of course Liverpool themselves are now walking a tight rope and cannot afford to drop any more points.  The remaining games though are not as bad compared to other teams.

There also has to be a dose of realism regarding the situation for Liverpool at the moment.  The squad is light which isn’t helped with major injuries to key players.  Consequently there are not many options that Klopp can turn to.  Liverpool have the fifth highest paid squad in the Premier league and it could be argued are roughly where you expect them to be.

The crowd itself also needs to help in times  of when things are not going well.  Without sounding all ‘member berry,’ (This refers to South Park and its take on nostalgia)

there was a time when following a stunned silence at the opposition somehow managing to score that there would be a roar encouraging the team to get back into the game.  Instead the only noise you can hear are the sounds of seats as the mass exodus starts.

That is more or less waving the white flag rather than screaming encouragement for Liverpool to push forward and salvage something.  It is amazing what the players can do with the support urging them forward that at the very least they can make it as uncomfortable for Palace in the dying minutes.

Jurgen Klopp talked about everyone from the cleaners, coaches, players, fans and anyone associated with the club to be all pulling together and doing their bit.  Which is what some Liverpool fans need to do rather than making the early dart.

There is still a big job ahead for Klopp no matter whether they finish top four or not.  Defensively they need improving not just in terms of buying defenders but in terms of defending as a team.  All season they have looked shaky but just as it is important to attack as a team it is equally the same when defending.  All the good teams know how to take the sting out of the game and show the resilience in coping with any pressure.  Liverpool do not have that ability at present.

Added to which the depth of the squad needs improving especially if they qualify for the Champions league.  Looking at the bench this season shows how limited Liverpool are on who they can bring on to help change the game.

All said and done though the race for the remaining top four places (Chelsea and Tottenham are nailed on for first and second) is pretty much on.  City and United have been inconsistent this season even if the latter have been on a good run of form.  Liverpool despite the setbacks and problems they have faced this season still have a good chance of finishing within the top four and claiming a Champions league spot.  There does though need to be a dose of reality with what Klopp has to work with and the fact that some teams at present are ahead of Liverpool.

The end of Paradise – Will Liverpool ever reclaim the title?

 

Nobody envisaged that when Alan Hansen held aloft the league championship in May 1990 that so far he would be the last Liverpool Captain to do so.  On that warm evening after beating Derby County 1-0  it was presumed to be business as normal.  After all Liverpool had been the dominant force over the past twenty years who prior to the ban on English teams competing in European club competitions had also dominated Europe.

Nobody even after the shock resignation of Kenny Dalglish as manager   in 1991  envisaged that Liverpool would fall down the pecking order.  Nor did they expect that the clock is still ticking twenty-seven years on when Liverpool could declare themselves the Champions of England.

There is still much debate as to how and why it happened.  Graeme Souness is largely held responsible for the dramatic decline with his inferior signings and brash manner.  However it is not as simple as this as was an ageing Liverpool team.  Previously players would be shipped on and replaced as soon as they hit the thirty mark. Hindsight though is a wonderful thing.

Here is a brief summary of each manager and of the problems they faced and how they left the club.

Graeme Souness

With Liverpool still in a state of shock after the sudden resignation of Kenny Dalglish the club turned to its former Captain and current Glasgow Rangers Manager Graeme Souness in April 1991.  Being a former player he would know the Liverpool way and in Scotland had turned around the fortunes of a stagnant Rangers into being the dominant force once more.

Souness was also a born winner who would not tolerate second best.  Something that he alluded to in his programme notes in the final game of the season against Spurs.

It was widely expected that Souness had a re-building job on his hands and that it might take a couple of years possibly three to bed in a new team.  Nobody though expected it be a traumatic three years of turmoil that saw the club going backwards rather than forward.

The major problem which was something that Souness later admitted was that he tried to change things too quickly.  There was also the added conflict with the senior players and former teammates over how he wanted to change the team.  Souness cited that even little things such as moving to drinking a lighter lager or banning fish and chips after a match was met with resistance.

The likes of Peter Beardsley, Ray Houghton, and Steve McMahon were allowed to go too soon with the replacements such as Mark Walters, Dean Saunders, and the notorious Istvan Kozma who earned the nickname ‘Lord Lucan,’ were simply not good enough.

Liverpool still continued to spend big money during that period in the desperate hope of getting it right.  The majority of it was not spent wisely with the likes of Paul Stewart, Julian Dicks and Neil Ruddock not having the ability that was normally required to play for Liverpool.  Nigel Clough was a flop with many believing that he would fit into Liverpool effortlessly with Souness even boldly declaring him as the next Kenny Dalglish.  The only similarities that Clough had was that they both wore the number seven shirt.

Not that it was all bad under Souness who allowed youngsters like McManaman, Fowler, and Redknapp the opportunity to make their mark for Liverpool.  Signings like Mark Wright and Michael Thomas gave fans a glimmer of hope that if they could get quality experienced players with the mix of youth players coming through that the future may not be as bleak.  Rob Jones incidentally signed from Crewe promised to be a steal due to his ability as a right back.

The FA cup was also won in Souness’s first full season in 1992 with goals from Rush and Thomas enough to beat Second division Sunderland.  However the incident with the Sun newspaper reviled on Merseyside due to its lies and notorious disgusting headlines about the Hillsborough disaster was to damage the relationship between the fans and Souness.  After the semi-final win against Portsmouth and with Souness recovering from a heart-bypass he allowed himself to be pictured in his hospital bed with an interview also published in the Sun.  With the anniversary of Hillsbrough it was a foolish and insensitive thing to do and Souness should really have been forced to resign.

With the conflict with players and the fans it wasn’t long before Souness announced his resignation in January 1994 after Liverpool were knocked out by Bristol City then in the second tier.

It certainly wasn’t the tenure that Souness wanted to be remembered for with the team seeming to be going backwards despite the money that had been spent. The club was starting to drift away from being the major force of the game when the club turned to Roy Evans a member of the fabled bootroom.

Roy Evans

After the disastrous Souness regime the Liverpool board went back to basics by appointing Roy Evans who along with coach Ronnie Moran were the last of the bootroom boys.

It was seen as a safe and a reassuring move for the Liverpool board and fans alike.  Here was someone who was tutored in the bootroom and would mend bridges with the senior players still left at Liverpool.

Unfortunately Roy Evans did not have the steel or ability to install the discipline a manager needs to ensure his players know who is in charge.  Bob Paisley and Joe Fagan may have looked and acted like the genial Uncle with their flat caps and comfy cardigans but when required had the ruthlessness to match a Mafia Don.

During Evans tenure in charge there were numerous stories of ill discipline from players making prank calls whilst Evans was being interviewed, players making a game of stealing his car park space, and Collymore alleging that Robbie Fowler got his manager in an arm lock and ruffled his head in jest.

In part it was to lead to the hated nickname of the Liverpool players the ‘spice boys,’ which inferred that the players were more interested in image than playing.  The notorious white suit cup final of 1996 emphasised this more than anything especially as they lost 1-0 to rivals Manchester United.

Evans certainly in his early days did bring back stability and nobody could deny that he brought about swashbuckling football.  Added to which during his time at Liverpool the club always finished within the top four.

Tactically Evans showed that he wasn’t adverse to changing things as Liverpool played with three at the back with wing backs.  It produced the type of football that resulted in two 4-3 wins against Newcastle United both of which were won in dramatic circumstances.

Liverpool also had the emergence of young talent with local youth team products Robbie Fowler and Steve McManaman with other young players such as Jamie Redknapp, David James, and Rob Jones.  All of which provided their best football under Evans.

It was the basis of a good mix with the experience of John Barnes and Ian Rush before they moved on.  At this point Liverpool were in a good position to start making up ground on Manchester United who were now the top team of English football.  The hardest part was getting the right players and ensuring they had the right attitude.  Evans though was not to get this right.

A clear out was always going to be needed with the likes of Julian Dicks and Torben Piechnik quickly being sold it could be argued that Neil Ruddock should also have been one of the first players to be shown the door.

Would the likes of Shankly, Paisley, and Fagan tolerated the unprofessional and lack of fitness that Neil Ruddock showed?  Never mind that he wasn’t up to the standard of required of a top-level defender.  The pass the pound game as told by Ruddock with the loser left holding the coin at the end of the game summed the attitude that was wrong within the club.

Despite his ability as a player Stan Collymore was another signing that probably wouldn’t have been made by Evans former bootroom colleagues.  There were already issues that had been highlighted during his time at Forest, Southend, and Palace that may have made them wary.  Collymore of course mentioned about his depression and it would have needed a manager that had the ability to show the support needed.  Unfortunately Evans was not that man.

The signings of Phil Babb, Jason McAteer, Leonhardsen to name but a few failed to reach the level required.  Roy Evans four years in charge was to be part frustration that the team had promise but fell just short.  Even when they challenged for the 1996-97 Premier league title they managed to finish fourth in what was deemed a two-horse race between Liverpool and Manchester United.

Crucially Liverpool didn’t show that resilience required to win league titles.  The ability that Ferguson’s United and indeed Liverpool teams of the past that would never give up no matter how bad they were playing.  Somehow they would always manage to get a result even against all odds.  Evans Liverpool team just couldn’t do that and faltered when they were required to get a result to stay ahead.

Evans only major honour was the league cup in 1995 which in that year was progress fresh from the debacle of the Souness years previously.  After being beaten in the Cup final by Man Utd a year later the 1996-97 season was the one Liverpool had to show that they had mettle to win the big titles.  Instead a year later Liverpool were regressing.  The defence was seen as weak with the team appearing to fall further behind Manchester United with Arsenal under their new French manager Arsene Wenger their main rivals.

Liverpool fans became frustrated at the lack of progress and feared that the eight years since they last won the title would continue for longer under Evans.  Many felt that he had given his best but didn’t have the ability or discipline to get Liverpool back on top.

Not for the first time the then club chairman David Moores and the board were unable or unwilling to make the tough decision.  Rather than asking Evans to resign and appoint a new manager or show that they had faith with Evans by telling fans that he was staying they went with a fudge by appointing Gerard Houllier as joint-manager.

With Ronnie Moran retiring in the summer of 1998 many fans felt that the Houllier was taking over as Evans number two.  Instead they realised that Liverpool now had two managers.

Roy Evans a loyal Liverpool man to the last went against his better judgment when the idea was to put to him.  If it was for the best of the club then he was prepared to go with it.  Sadly Evans was in a no win situation.  If Liverpool were to step up and win titles then Gerard Houllier would gain the plaudits.  Equally if things went wrong which they did during that 1998-99 season then it would be Evans who would take the blame and lose his job.

A defeat in November 1998 against Tottenham in the league cup saw Evans deciding that he had to walk away stating ‘if it’s not working then it would be a bigger mistake to stay.’

Gerard Houllier

The only link that Gerard Houllier had with Liverpool prior to his appointment as manager was as a school teacher during his previous time in the City.  Liverpool felt that a fresh approach was required and since French was in vogue following Arsene Wenger’s Arsenal won the double and France winning the World Cup hired Houllier.

The joint manager scheme by the Liverpool board appeared to be done in the vain hope of a losing gambler throwing his last fiver on a 30/1 outsider.  Inevitably it was to fail and in November Gerard Houllier was now solely in charge of Liverpool.

One of the first things that Houllier sought to improve besides the discipline within the club was to improve the defence that was soft and nervous.  It was to see a more organised and disciplined approach with the players associated with unprofessionalism shown the door.  The football though was to become more dour and cautious with conflict between the Kop’s favourite player Robbie Fowler and Houllier.

The disruptive influences of the likes of Neil Ruddock and Phil Babb were quickly shown the door with Steve McManaman deciding to take up the challenge of playing abroad and signing for Real Madrid.  It was a move that irked some Liverpool fans as due to McManaman’s contract expiring he was able to leave on a free transfer.  That though was the club’s fault for allowing the situation to progress as it did.

With the dawn of a new millennium it was also hoped to be the start of the glory days for Liverpool.  Three trophies within the 90’s was a drought as far as Liverpool football club were concerned.

Houllier strengthened the defence with Sami Hyppia and Stephane Henchoz being signed.  David James whose confidence appeared to be shattered after some high-profile clangers was sold to Aston Villa with Sander Westerveld becoming the new number one.  Didi Hamann was also signed from Newcastle and the talented Czech Vladimir Smicer joining his compatriot Patrik Berger.  Titi Camara was also signed as a forward.

The changes in the team could be seen instantly in that they looked more resilient and solid in defence.  However it was not to be as attacking as Evans Liverpool with caution now being the motif.  Houllier was of the ilk that the team did not need to have the ball to control the game and believed it was about taking that one big chance in the game.

Nevertheless there was still first class talent with Michael Owen being given his chance by Roy Evans looking to prove his potential.  All the signs were good especially as he scored a wonder goal against Argentina in the 1998 World cup.  David Thompson was regarded as the next big thing but it was to be a young kid from Huyton Steven Gerrard who would become the next idol of the Kop.

The gap between Liverpool taking their place at the top was widening and it was now vitally important that the club got the appointment right.  Under Houllier who appointed Phil Thompson as his number two the club despite early promise failed to do so.

Although Houllier’s first full season failed to produce any trophies with Liverpool failing to claim a Champions league place it was the 2000-01 season that brought success.  With Emile Heskey signed in March 2000 and the experienced Gary McAllister that helped the club win the treble of FA cup, League and UEFA cup.  Houllier also managed to ensure that Liverpool finished third to qualify for the Champions league.

It should have been the catalyst to spur Liverpool on to take that big step and be genuine contenders for the league.  Instead the club was to stumble and with some poor signings after finishing second in the 2001-02 season the club was to go backwards yet again.

Why Houllier had decided to spend £10 million on El Hadji Diouf rather than making the loan signing of Nicolas Anelka permanent is still puzzling.  Aside from Diouf’s attitude he was a player that would not fit with the way Houllier set his team up.  Diouf was not a centre-forward to play in a 4-4-2 formation and indeed he was more of an attacking midfielder.  Either way it was a gamble that was not to pay off.  The likes of his compatriot Salif Diao who was average at best.  Then of course there was Bruno Cheyrou who was dubbed the ‘next Zidane,’ by Houllier but the only similarity he had was as a doppleganger.

Although Manchester United were beaten 2-0 for Liverpool to win the Worthington league cup it was to be a poor season for Liverpool who managed to finish fifth.

Harry Kewell was signed from Leeds to bring that extra bit of guile that the critics felt was required but Houllier was on borrowed time for the 2003-04 season.  With the football poor on the eye to watch and results not up to the requirements it was no surprise that in 2004 Houllier parted ways with Liverpool.

Was Houllier’s stint in charge of the reds a success?  Well he would certainly argue that he won trophies but never ever got close to winning what is now the holy grail which is the league title.  Supporters of Houllier would also say that he brought in the much needed discipline in the club, helped develop Steven Gerrard and Jamie Carragher who eventually found his position in defence.

Liverpool needed someone with the quality to bridge the ever increasing gap between their rivals.  Despite making ground they stumbled and fell behind.  Signings after 2001 were poor and Houllier was mocked when he kept talking about turning a corner after winning after a bad run only to get beat the following week.

Another problem that Houllier had was the quality of football that watching was like being on mogadon.  If results are going your way then you can get away with it but when it is producing poor results then fans are not going to accept it.

There was also the added problem that despite the UEFA cup win that Houllier was tactically outwitted on the continent.  Barcelona in November 2001 outplayed Liverpool as they won 3-1 at Anfield whilst Valencia cut Liverpool apart in 2002 with the 1-0 score line not as close as indicated.

Houllier in the same year had a chance of making the semi-finals against Manchester United and were drawing 1-1 in the second leg after winning 1-0 at Anfield.  For reasons unknown and with thirty minutes still on the clock Houllier took off Hamann for Smicer and upset the balance of the team.  Leverkusen took advantage and won 4-2 which was enough to take them through to the semi’s.

Sadly though Houllier was not the manager that the Liverpool board thought they were getting.  The impression was that he would be similiar to Wenger especially as he was noted for recruiting young talent.  Instead of signing the likes of Henry, Viera, and Pires Houllier signed Le Tallec, Pongolle, and Cheyrou.  Liverpool now turned their eyes to Spain and were impressed with a young coach who had recently won La Liga and the UEFA cup.  Rafael Benitez.

Rafael Benitez

After falling out with the Valencia board over the lack of say over signings Rafael Benitez took up the offer of replacing Gerard Houllier.  It was again to be another rebuilding job but this time Liverpool had a manager with winning credentials.  To win two La liga titles over the giants that are Barcelona and Real Madrid was one hell of an achievement.  The hope was that Benitez coaching ability would see Liverpool leapfrog Manchester United, Arsenal, and Chelsea who had also appointed Jose Mourinho.

Benitez may not have delivered the title but he did come close in the 2008-09 season with Liverpool finishing second on eighty six points.  This incidentally was more than when they last won the league.  Nevertheless Benitez had made Liverpool a force to be reckoned with in Europe.  That Champions league win in Istanbul was one of the most surreal, dream like, and dramatic final as Liverpool came back from 3-0 down at half time against Milan to win on penalties after scoring three in six mad minutes.

The signings of Alonso and Garcia proved to be excellent signings with the likes of Torres and Mascherano also joining the club during Benitez’s time in charge.  There was to be another dramatic final against West Ham as Steven Gerrard once again rescued the club with a last-minute free kick to make it three all and after extra time it went to penalties with Liverpool again proving their cool to win the shoot out.

Another European cup final beckoned in 2007 but Milan gained revenge as they beat the reds 2-1.  This though was where Liverpool were expected to kick on and make a serious challenge for the title.  The 2008-09 season was really the season Liverpool should have won the title.

That second half of the season Benitez seemed to let the shackles off with Liverpool blitzing teams.  Real Madrid were thrashed 4-0 at Anfield.  Another highlight of course putting four past Manchester United at Old Trafford.  Torres with his blistering accelerating pace was scoring goals for fun with Alonso and Gerrard running the midfield.  Yet Manchester United witheld under pressure to win another title.

Looking at the fixtures there are three home games from later November to December against Fulham, West Ham, and Hull that Liverpool could only draw.  If Liverpool had lost one of them but won the other two would have won on goal difference.  However ifs do not win things.

With David Moores selling the club to Hicks and Gillett it was to be a downturn for Liverpool as the two cowboys saddled the club with a massive debt in order to purchase the club.  As a result Liverpool were in a mess with Benitez frustrated in his plans to obtain the players required.

In his last season in charge Liverpool were off the pace and with Benitez at odds with the owners left by mutal consent in 2010.

Again it was to be a case of much promise and optimism but falling short of winning that nineteenth league title.  Benitez had brought back the respect for Liverpool as during his tenure they were one of the leading sides in Europe.  Furthermore Benitez was responsible for not just the memories of Istanbul but the European runs.  Gerrard scoring a dramatic winner against Olympiacos to take Liverpool into the knock out stage and the noise, passion, belief and simply wanting Liverpool to be in the final that sucked in Garcia’s goal against Chelsea in the semi to take Liverpool to their sixth European cup final.

Hicks and Gillette certainly had a major impact on Liverpool regressing yet again but it could be argued that Liverpool had become too defensive.  The players also seemed to have lost belief with the frustration on Gerrard’s face after Torres was substituted against Birmingham in April 2010 which Liverpool needed to win but could only draw 1-1.

Liverpool were in a world of uncertainty with morale low amongst the Liverpool support who were worried what Hicks and Gillette were taking the club.  It was in some respects about to get worse.

Roy Hodgson

There was a look of disbelief amongst Liverpool fans when Roy Hodgson was announced as Benitez’s replacement.  He had managed abroad for Malmo, Inter Milan, and the Swiss national side.  Hodgson had been sacked by Blackburn in 1998 before returning back to England in 2006 to manage Fulham and leading them to a Europa cup final.

From the off the majority of fans were against him who wanted the return of Kenny Dalglish.  The only time Hodgson’s name was chanted was in sarcasm with ‘Hodgson for England.’  Results though were not to turn fans around.  Instead Liverpool were to plunge further.

In some ways you sometimes realise how hard it is to compete at the highest level.  Hodgson looked like a rabbit caught in the headlights at Man City as the Mancunians ran riot whilst Hodgson looked on bewildered and unsure what to do.  His signing Paul Konchesky summed up Hodgson who was so far out of his depth for Liverpool that at times it was like watching a player drowning openly on the pitch.

Consequently it came as no surprise after Liverpool were eventually sold to the Fenway sports group and Kenny Dalglish came back to bring back much needed stability.

Kenny Dalglish (the return)

Some people advise never to look back or allow sentiment get in the way of making decisions in football but for the Fenway group who were now in charge of Liverpool it made sense after dismissing Hodgson.

With Dalglish in charge he smoothed the waters and provided the stability the club needed.  His second stint was not as successful as it was when he first took charge in 1985-91 but for the Liverpool supporters he could do no wrong.

The question was whether Damien Comoli had too much say in the players that Liverpool signed.  Apart from Suarez the likes of Stewart Downing, Andy Carroll, and Charlie Adam were not up to the level required to compete at the top.  Consequently it was no surprise he was dismissed in April 2012.

Although Dalglish was given a three year deal and helped guide Liverpool to a league cup win against Cardiff and runner’s up to Chelsea in the 2012 FA cup final he too was dismissed due to Liverpool finishing eighth.

It is hard to judge Dalglish on his second return as it seemed it was always going to be short term and was more about bringing stability to the club.

Brendan Rodgers

After guiding Swansea to the Premier league and winning praise for the Welsh club’s first season in the top flight Liverpool decided to take a chance on a young promising manager.

There were a few frowns as fans felt Liverpool should have appointed someone with more experience but were prepared to give Rodgers the chance.  Besides the tika taka posession game was pretty much in vogue and Rodgers was an advocate of the posession game.

By now Liverpool had slipped further down and were no longer regulars in the Champions league with their last stint in the competition coming in the 2009-10 season.  Rodgers task was to build stability and get Liverpool back amongst the top four.

It was to be a distinctly average first season with no European football but the following season 2013-14 was to see Liverpool almost claim the title.  The football was very attacking with Suarez leading the line.  In some respects Rodgers team were of the mind of if you score one, we’ll score one more than you.  A defeat against Chelsea at Anfield left it wide open and despite being 3-0 up away to Crystal Palace continued to surge forward in the attempt to boost their goal difference.  Instead Liverpool collapsed with Palace scoring three goals with only eleven minutes left on the clock to grab a dramatic draw.  Despite beating Newcastle at home it was to be Manchester City who sneaked in to win the league.

With Luis Suarez sold to Barcelona and the signings especially Balotelli not proving to be successful Liverpool failed to push and finished outside of the top four.  Their return to the Champions league was to be an embarrasment as despite a group that contained Ludogorets and Basle failed to qualify.  Real Madrid were the only genuine contenders but Liverpool were weakly submissive as they were beaten 3-0 at Anfield and 1-0 at the Bernabeu.  Rodgers had also put up the white flag with the latter fixture as he made seven changes with notably Gerrard, Sterling, and Henderson dropped and put on the bench.

Liverpool seemed to lose that strength of imposing themselves on their opponents and with an ageing Gerrard he was unable to take the game by the scruff of the neck as he used to do.  The calamatious 2-1 semi-final defeat against Villa in the FA cup with Liverpool wilting  despite Coutinho giving the reds the lead meant that Rodgers was on borrowed time.

This was certainly true for the 2015-16 season as Rodgers was intent on Liverpool keeping within the top four.  Indeed it seemed as though he was told to ensure that he had to obtain a certain amount of points.  A draw against Everton was his last game in charge with the enigmatic Jurgen Klopp taking charge.

Rodgers promised so much but failed to deliver at the crucial times.  In europe he was naive and outwitted with the panic appearing to set in when Liverpool needed a win against Basle at Anfield but played a very defensive line up.  Consequently it was no surprise that it ended 1-1.

The being Liverpool documentary didn’t help matters as Rodgers came across as David Brent.  At times he also seemed to tie himself up in knots with tactics with players looking unsure as to what they were meant to be doing as he changed the formation during games.

Rodgers signings were also questionable and it seemed as if he had no say in who Liverpool signed with the transfer committee having a final say.  This was particularly evident when Balotelli was announced with Rodgers seemingly unconvinced.  In the end as hard as it sounds Rodgers just simply wasn’t up to the task.

Jurgen Klopp

Only time will tell whether Klopp will bring back the success to Liverpool.  Undoubtedly due to his success at Dortmund he is one of the best coaches in Europe.  Last season he got Liverpool to the league and Europa cup final with the latter against all odds considering the quality of teams that they played.

Added to which the likes of Lallana, Firmino, and even Mignolet have all improved under the tutelege of Klopp.

One thing for sure is that Klopp is charasmatic  and wants to bring back fun to Anfield.  Furthermore he wants everyone from the tea ladies, the fans, coaches, and players to all work together and to enjoy the ride.  The hardest thing of course is getting the right signings.

Conclusion

It is hard to blame one particular individual for the fall of Liverpool from the top.  Souness tried to change things too quickly and signed inferior players.  Evans was unable to install the required discipline with his teams unable to show the resilence and desire to grind out results against all odds.  Again the signings and particular the defence was poor.

Eight years after Liverpool last won the title was when Liverpool really needed to get it right.  The team had the nuculeas of a young team containing the likes of Fowler, McManaman, Redknapp, Owen, Carragher, and a up and coming Gerrard.  Instead they appointed Gerard Houllier whose career was pretty mediocre before joining Liverpool.

Despite the hype Houllier was no Arsene Wenger not just in terms of the football provided but despite the promise of his contacts was unable to find the young talent that Wenger did in his early years at Arsenal.  Indeed the majority of his signings were poor and the football was dour, defensive, and  predictable.  Instead of Liverpool taking that step forward they took a step back.

David Moores also has to take responsibility in terms of not making the tough decisions and allowing sentiment to get in the way of making the tough decisions.

The joint manager scheme with Evans and Houllier was weak and wasted a season.  Moores should have made a decision rather than hoping against hope it would work.

Selling to Hicks and Gillette was a disaster which very nearly took the club under.  This incidentally was at a time when the money was being pumped into Chelsea and Man City who now overtook Liverpool

Nostalgia also played its part with one eye always on the past that in some respects it has been a anchor around the club’s neck.  Ironically the Liverpool way was always to look forward and never to let sentiment to get in the way of making decisions for the good of the club.  It was always about keeping one step ahead, moving players on at the right time, and ensuring the replacements were of the same quality if not better.  Too much it could be argued is spent reminiscing about the past.

Liverpool under the Fenway group are trying to run the club more efficiently and do not have the inclination or ability to throw big money on superstars.It doesn’t mean that Liverpool can’t challenge at the top in the near future.  They certainly have the manager who can get the best out of his players which is Klopp.  Atletico Madrid have shown that if you get the recruitment right that it can be done.

The fact is that whilst the likes of Madrid, Barcelona, Bayern Munich, Chelsea, and Man City are at the top table, Liverpool are just below.  Nothing stands still and Liverpool at present have been overtaken.  That’s not to say that it can’t change but it just may take time and patience.

Why Labour’s right are equally in denial as the left

Nick Cohen wrote an expletitive plea or should it be a rant telling Corbynista’s ‘to stop being a fucking fool by changing your fucking mind.’  In many respects it was akin to a spoilt child screaming ‘I’ll scream and scream, until I’ll make myself sick!’  By accusing Corbyn supporters of being in denial and that the party is in danger of going into meltdown unless they appoint their special one they too are very much in denial.  

To automatically assume that someone like Yvette Cooper or Chuka Umunna have not just got the personality but the ability to turn around the fortunes of the Labour Party is arrogant to say the least.  After all an illegal war in Iraq, presiding over one of the biggest financial crisis in recent years, and ignoring your grass root support on the assumption that the plebs will vote for ever is wearing the red rosette is one of the many reasons why Labour is in the mess it finds itself in now.

The problem with Labour is that it’s support is completely fractured.  In Scotland they have practically become an endangered species whilst in certain heartlands they feel the party no longer represents them with some even attracted to UKIP.  Added to which is the difficulty in appealing to the marginal seats to cross the line to form a majority government.  Ed Milliband and Gordon Brown in the last two elections were unable to convince the electorate and here lies the problem.  

Like everything in life nothing stands still especially as we react to the world around us.  That’s why it is always important to continually evolve and ensure that the party is not just in tune with its members but its electorate.  This is easier said than done but to not realise that New Labour is part of the problem of the party and not the remedy is a problem for the right of the party.

In some respects there is that smugness that only they know what is best and those that disagree about the direction of the party are fools especially if its a left slant.  Ever since Corbyn has been elected as leader he has been constantly undermined by  not just the PLP but the media such as the Guardian who in the past have supported the Labour Party.

Members voted for Jeremy Corbyn because they wanted what they perceived to be real change and what they feel the Labour Party should stand for.  Rather than showing support and working as best they can they have throw a tantrum akin to a spoilt toddler at a birthday party.  

New Labour was part of the problem as to why they lost the 2010 and 2015 election.  To persist that the third way still works and that the electorate will somehow be convinced by someone speaking in cliches and slogans is to continually row around in circles.  

It could be said that Gordon Brown allowed this void to happen where there was no one to step up to the plate that could lead and appeal to the electorate.  Obsessed with keeping power with power battles between Tony Blair anybody afterwards was always going to be tainted with either side.  This is certainly true of Ed Milliband and the other candidates such as Yvette Cooper for the 2015 Labour leadership election.

Nobody at present has the charisma or clout that would appeal to all voters.  Furthermore any of Cohen or the Labour right’s preferred choices would do any better than Corbyn.  At least he wants to offer an alternative.  Yes it can be argued that Corbyn seems to be out of his depth and the shadow chancellor John McDonnell certainly is but a tilt to the right isn’t going to balance the ship.  

The Labour Party is in a mess and needs to find a fresh approach that appeals to all.  Furthermore there is hard work in attempting to get a foothold into Scotland as well as appealing to the marginals that would swing an election.  

New Labour has become old Labour with the public just as distrustful of the old guard or anyone associated with the third way.   To move forward is to work together and slowly build up bit by bit.  They do say that loss (which is the case of the right losing control of Labour) brings denial, anger, and acceptance so maybe Cohen, Toynbee, and the others on the Labour right are now on the second stage before realising the reality they now face.  

That is a party that needs re-building with fresh ideas, working together rather than fighting, and not looking back to the past.